Wednesday, March 16, 2011

MORE CHANGES, INCLUDING DISASTER

I'll start with the simple.

I decided, at the end of my last post, to "try to get myself looking presentable." As if such a thing were possible.

But, by pre-arrangement, I am using a picture of me snapped by Genie's daughter, Holly, at Paris and Beyond. Now this is a good picture!

But there are bigger things than me. Much bigger.

One of my first discoveries, upon waking, was that Japan had experienced of a massive earthquake and tidal wave (tsunami).  I saw the pictures of the tsunami hitting village and city alike, rolling over and sweeping away everything that stood before it.

I remember a reporter picking a porcelain doll out of the detritus at the Sendai airport. There was wreckage from  all over — construction materials to cars. And I wondered. Was this doll owned by some little girl? Is she alive or dead? Did she treasure this doll? Will it ever get back to her?

Perhaps the most frightening thing for me was the ongoing story of nuclear reactor failures, and the threat those failures pose — for Japan, and the rest of us. How big is the radioactive plume? How far will it spread? What will be the consequences of Japan's electrical industry? How will this affect other nuclear installations? (I've seen a story that Germany is shutting down any pre-1980 nuclear plants for inspection; there is question of whether any of these will reopen.) And what lies ahead for children, even un-born children, who were caught in the wrong place during this nuclear disaster?

It is said the Japanese people are both stoic and resilient. They will rebuild. At the cost of a few trillion dollars, perhaps.

13 comments:

rosaria said...

We are all still in a shock at so much devastation.

potsoc said...

The Japanese are very creative. I'm sure they will, collectively, pull out of it.

Helen said...

It is virtually impossible to wrap one's mind around the magnitude of this tragedy.

The Blog Fodder said...

Latest on BBC is still saying no panic...yet. I don't understand why they don't have new pumps brought in yet, they are having trouble keeping sea water into the cooling chambers.
There has been some radiation escape but nothing like could happen with a melt down. It is Three Mile Island all over again - lots of scary talk and no real problem. Yet.
I do hope they can keep a lid on it.

The Blog Fodder said...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-12745186

Frances said...

This is a heck of a time to come out of hibernation, isn't it? As I follow the news from Japan and other parts of the world, I continue to wonder how much of what is reported is actually true, and how much truth is not being reported.

So many questions are rolling around in my head, that I often wish for a long nap. I find discovering any answers to be very hard work.

xo

Genie -- Paris and Beyond said...

Hi Bear,

I am so glad that you are using the photo that we snapped for you in Paris! I missed your first return post as I have been in Oregon for the week working. Sorry that Miss Sadie is not with you I know that she will be fine and I hope that you will be able to visit her.

Prayers for those affected by the disasters of Japan...

Bises,
g

Snowbrush said...

Despite the run on iodide tablets along the U.S Pacific coast, there is no indication that the radiation will be a problem this far away. At least there's that.

Amanda said...

there's no real precedent in modern history to what the japanese people are experiencing now. the nuclear reactors were built to withstand earthquakes, but perhaps not a 9.0, not to mention tsunamis. we watch as they struggle with this, try to help, and hopefully try to learn from this horrible tragedy.

Diana said...

It is such a tragedy indeed. But I don't feel fear about the reactors. As my mother used to always tell me, "When it's our time to go, we're gonna go.". I have much faith in what God has planned. Love Di ♥

dana said...

Wait a minute? Didn't I start reading your post expecting to see a photo of you? I'm living in Florida - Death's waiting room, so maybe I'm already senile....

As for Japan, I do believe their pronouncement that their nuclear workers returned to work means nothing more than publicity to stop a panic. I can't help but suspect those workers are in the position of WORK or get FIRED.

Natalie said...

I just send love and money. All you can really do. :(

Rob-bear said...

Well, friends. The radiation seeping out of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant is making news. It has already been noticed in California, though not at dangerous levels.

However, there are reports that food, milk, and water in the Fukushima area (and beyond) are many times above what is considered a safe level of radiation.

One problem after the next.